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September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
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September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

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August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
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Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

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September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
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September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

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August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
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Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

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September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
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September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

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August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
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Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

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September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
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September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

​​
August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
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Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

Less
September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


​​​​​​​​​​​ ​​
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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
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September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

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August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
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Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

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September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
​​

September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



​​​​​

August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

​​
August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
​​

Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

Less
September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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​​

August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


​​​​​​​​​​​ ​​
​​
Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
​​

September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



​​​​​

August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

​​
August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
​​

Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

Less
September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
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September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

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August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
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Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

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September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
​​

September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

​​
August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
​​

Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

Less
September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


​​​​​​​​​​​ ​​
​​
Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
​​

September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



​​​​​

August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

​​
August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
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Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

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September 9, 2021
4:00 p.m. EDT
  • Since Hurricane Ida’s peak on August 30, power has been restored to more than 80 percent of impacted customers as of 1:00 p.m. EDT. This number includes the restoration results for impacted EEI member companies, as well as electric cooperatives and public power utilities, in Louisiana and Mississippi.*
  • Impacted electric companies in Louisiana report that the catastrophic hurricane damaged more than 30,000 power poles, more than 36,000 spans of wire, and more than 6,000 transformers. In total, Hurricane Ida destroyed more power poles than Hurricanes Delta, Ike, Katrina, and Zeta combined.
  • An army of more than 27,000 workers from across the country was mobilized to assist in the restoration efforts. Companies affected by Ida, and the crews assisting them, will continue to work around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible to every customer who is able to receive it. Because of the amount of damage to their homes, some customers will be unable to have their power restored.
  • Our thoughts continue to be with all who have been impacted by Ida and with those who are helping in the recovery and power restoration efforts. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this historic restoration and rebuild.
​​​​*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage. Electric companies have completed their power restoration efforts in the parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast that were impacted by Ida’s remnants last week. At their peak, outages in those areas totaled approximately 212,000.​
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August 23, 2021

5:00 p.m. EDT

Tropical Storm Henri made landfall yesterday in Rhode Island, bringing heavy rain and inland flooding across parts of the Northeast. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT today, electric companies and their partners had restored power to more than 108,000 customers, or 77 percent of customers impacted by Henri. Fewer than 32,000 electricity customers remain without power.*

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding as crews work around the clock to restore power, provided it is safe to do so. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration effort will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

Electric companies mobilized more than 13,500 workers from at least 31 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada to help restore power to customers.

Strong industry-government coordination and cross-sector collaboration are critical during storms like Henri. Industry and government leaders continue to coordinate at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council​ (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​. Once trees and debris are cleared and flood waters recede, crews will conduct damage assessments. Then, they will work to restore power to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety, such as hospitals, nursing homes, fire and police departments, and water systems. Crews then will work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

Customers should:

  • Keep your emergency outage kit readily accessible.
  • Stay away from downed or sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Never use a portable generator inside your home, garage, crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Never go into a basement with standing water in it unless you are sure that the power is off.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water, or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • If your power goes out, to keep food cold, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors. Discard any perishable food that has been at temperatures above 40° F for 2 hours or more (or 1 hour if temperatures are above 90° F).
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • Keep your distance from electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines. Please practice proper social distancing to allow them to safely complete their work.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.


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Extreme cold weather and a series of winter storms have impacted electric companies and their customers across the country in recent days. We know that being without electricity creates serious hardships, and we thank customers—especially those in Texas—for their patience and understanding during this difficult period.

As of 10:00 a.m. EST on February 19, approximately 190,000 customers were without power in Texas. Earlier this week, Texas’s primary grid operator—the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)—ordered electric companies to interrupt power delivery to address a statewide generation shortfall. Now, power supply conditions are improving, allowing electric companies to restore impacted customers. 

In some areas of Texas, the energy grid was damaged by winter weather and record-breaking low temperatures. This damage could not be identified until energy supplies were restored and equipment was re-energized. Industry mutual assistance networks are activated to support restoration efforts, and crews continue working around the clock to restore power to impacted customers. 

Outside of Texas, several states—including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon, Virginia, and West Virginia—have been hard hit by devastating ice and winter storms. Electric companies and crews continue to make significant progress in restoring power and are working safely and as quickly as possible. Industry mutual assistance networks also are activated where needed, and companies will not stop their restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power has been restored.

We are profoundly grateful to the heroic men and women of our workforce. While crews continue to work in our communities, we understand that people are frustrated and that they may want to ask questions. Please remember the importance of practicing social distancing and keeping these lineworkers healthy and safe.

EEI has the following resources available for customers:

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Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00 p.m. EST

Hurricane Zeta brought destructive high winds and heavy rains to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 144,900 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of nearly 3.1 million on Thursday.* Crews already have restored power to more than 95 percent of all impacted customers.

EEI member companies in Texas and Oklahoma also are making progress to restore power following an historic ice storm that caused catastrophic and widespread damage last week. As of 5:00 p.m. EST, approximately 146,700 electricity customers were without power in affected areas, down from a peak of 457,000 on Wednesday.* While long-duration ice storms cause extensive damage and create unique power-restoration challenges, nearly 68 percent of customers have been restored already

More than 23,000 workers from at least 29 states and Canada are working to restore power to customers impacted by Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm. Companies affected by the storms, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, will continue to work day and night to restore power safely and as quickly as possible.

Electric companies in the path of Hurricane Zeta and the ice storm prepositioned crews, resources, and equipment to respond to power outages. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response to both of these events. Earlier today, the ESCC issued a statement highlighting how impacted electric companies are working with their state and local election officials to understand their needs and support the timely recovery of designated voting locations.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We ask for, and greatly appreciate, our customers’ patience and understanding.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • ​Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Assume that all fallen wires and anything touching them are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

 

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of Zeta and the ice storms, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

October 13, 2020, 6:00 p.m. EDT

More than 18,500 workers from at least 27 states continue to work day and night to restore power to the customers and communities that were impacted by Hurricane Delta. As of 5:00 p.m. EDT, approximately 95,800 customers were without power as a result of Delta in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, down from a peak of nearly 824,000.* Crews already have restored power to nearly 90 percent of all impacted customers who are able to receive power, less than four days after the storm made landfall.

Electric companies in the path of Delta started to prepare last week by prepositioning crews, resources, and equipment to respond to any power outages when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. Industry and government are coordinating at the highest levels through the CEO-led Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) to ensure an effective and efficient response.

The energy grid is highly interconnected, and just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhoods or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. Customers should not touch any electrical equipment that was damaged during the storm. In some cases, customers may need to have a licensed electrician inspect their equipment before power can be restored. An example of this would be a tree falling on the part of a home where wires connect to the house.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews also must follow additional safety protocols that may slow restoration processes.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding. We also know that many customers impacted by Hurricane Delta also were impacted by Hurricane Laura, and our thoughts and prayers are with them. Electric companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

To ensure safety, customers should:

  • Stay away from standing water and downed or sagging power lines. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Never use a generator inside a home, garage, crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Plug appliances directly into the generator; do not connect them to your home’s circuits.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Allow restoration workers and other first responders to do their jobs. Stay off roads, beaches, and waterways, and avoid returning home until state emergency officials have indicated it is safe to do so. Having roadways clogged with traffic will only impede restoration efforts.
  • Never approach crews, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.

September 21, 2020

9:00 a.m. EDT

Electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to almost 533,000 customers, or more than 90 percent of those affected by Hurricane Sally. As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, approximately 53,000 customers remained without power as a result of Sally, primarily in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

Companies affected by the storm, and the crews assisting the restoration effort, are working around the clock to restore power as quickly as possible when and where they can, provided it is safe to do so. More than 11,000 workers are dedicated to the Sally restoration mission, and crews are being reallocated strategically to ensure a safe, efficient response. 

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely.

Companies will not stop their storm restoration efforts until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. Due to the added complexities created by the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing guidelines, we greatly appreciate customers’ patience and understanding and urge them to prepare for the possibility of extended power outages.

Customers should remember these vital safety messages:

  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Downed power lines and submerged electrical equipment may energize water, posing a lethal hazard to humans and animals. 
  • Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company. Do not assume your neighbors will report outages.
  • Do not return home until local officials announce that it is safe to do so. 
  • Stay off the roads to allow first responders and restoration crews to do their jobs safely and efficiently. 
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter enclosed spaces. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Have electrical appliances and equipment that have been submerged in water, including the outside unit of an air conditioning system, checked by a qualified repair technician before use. If electric meter boxes, conduits, or wires were under water or are bent or broken, or if water rose above electrical outlets, contact a licensed electrician. Never touch damaged electrical equipment.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies will never request upfront payment or a ‘reconnection fee’ in return for restoring your service. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other related outage.
  • If you see crews working, please do not approach them, and please remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
In addition to Sally, EEI member companies continue to respond to the widespread catastrophic wildfires burning in the West. At the same time, crews continue to work around the clock to rebuild the transmission system that was destroyed by Hurricane Laura in Louisiana. We also are monitoring Hurricane Teddy in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico for any impact on customers. As an industry, we are committed to powering through these events together.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​
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September 11, 2020, 8:00 a.m.

The transmission system serves as the backbone of the energy grid and delivers high-voltage electricity from where it is generated to where it is needed. In Louisiana, more than 1,000 transmission structures—and entire sections of the transmission system—were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Laura.

Crews working to rebuild or to repair the transmission system are facing enormous challenges, but they are committed to restoring power and hope to impacted customers and communities. As of 8:00 a.m. EDT, more than 883,000—or nearly 90 percent of—customers have had their power restored following this historic and devastating storm.

Electric companies in Laura’s path have the support of the entire industry—including an army of mutual assistance workers aiding them in the restoration effort—and our federal government partners, as they focus on the herculean task of rebuilding the transmission grid. This work and coordination will continue for as long as it takes to get the lights back on.

 



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August 14, 2020

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT, electric companies and their restoration partners have restored power to more than 1.3 million customers—or 85 percent of impacted customers—following the massive derecho and severe thunderstorms that brought catastrophic winds to a large swath of the Midwest on Monday. Approximately 246,000 customers remain without power in the hardest-hit areas in Iowa and Illinois as a result of this destructive storm system.*

Impacted electric companies and mutual assistance crews from at least 20 states and the District of Columbia were activated to respond to this storm. Crews are working around the clock to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. As customers are restored, electric companies are reallocating and redeploying resources to help customers still without power.

Power restoration follows a detailed process​​, and safety always is the top priority. After damage assessments are complete, power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety. Crews then work to return service to the largest number of residential and business customers in the shortest amount of time. Once major repairs are completed, individual homes and smaller groups of customers are restored.

While customers may not see electric company personnel in their neighborhoods, the energy grid is heavily interconnected, and crews are working throughout the system to bring power back on quickly and safely. 

Unfortunately, given the nature of the damage caused by the derecho, some customers may not be able to receive power to their homes after it is restored. Many local codes require that a licensed electrician or a city/county inspector check the system first. This will delay the restoration of services for individual customers. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult period. We also thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the restoration efforts and are working to restore power—and hope—to customers and communities.

As always, customers should:

  • Stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.​​​​​

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August 11, 2020

Last week, Tropical Storm Isaias caused severe damage along the East Coast. As of today, power has been restored to 99 percent of the customers impacted by Isaias, and electric company crews continue their work around the clock as they go from neighborhood to neighborhood to complete power restoration after this historic storm. Electric companies and the crews aiding the restoration efforts will not stop working until the last customer who can receive power is restored.

How Power Is Restored After a Storm

Power restoration follows a step-by-step process​. The first step of storm restoration is damage assessment, and safety always is the top priority. 

After power is restored to essential services and facilities critical to public health and safety (like hospitals and nursing homes), crews focus next on repairing lines that will return service to the largest number of customers in the least amount of time. Power is restored systematically to neighborhoods, industries, and businesses and then to individual homes and small groups of customers. 

The energy grid is highly interconnected. Just because customers do not see crews in their neighborhood or on their streets does not mean that they are not working to restore power. 

EEI and our member companies thank the dedicated men and women who are part of the power restoration efforts and are working to bring the lights back on for customers and communities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, crews must follow additional safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our restoration workforce and our customers.

Ensuring the safety of our customers and crews is our top priority. Customers should:
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized.
  • Immediately report downed power lines to their local electric company.
  • Keep roads clear for first responders and restoration workers.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • Be wary of criminals impersonating electric company employees. Scammers are opportunistic and will use storms and other disasters to target electric customers. Electric companies do not require payment to restore electricity after a natural disaster or other outage.
  • Never approach crews working, and always remember the importance of social distancing so our mission-essential workers can continue to work safely.
We know that being without electricity creates hardships and is frustrating during ordinary times. We greatly appreciate our customers’ patience throughout this extraordinarily difficult time.

*It is important to remember that outages measure customer meters impacted, not the number of individuals without power. Due to the nature of the storm, customers may have experienced more than one outage.
​​

Tornados, severe thunderstorms, high winds, and heavy rain have caused widespread power outages across many parts of the South, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. In the impacted areas, electric companies are making progress restoring power for customers, while maintaining safety protocols required by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to keep customers and crews safe.

We know that being without electricity creates hardships during ordinary times—and now we are in the midst of an extraordinary pandemic that is creating extra challenges for customers and electric companies. We appreciate your patience and understanding as our crews work to restore power safely and as quickly as possible. Learn how power is restored after a storm.

As always, please remember these important safety messages:

  • Do not approach electric company workers or contractors as they make repairs. They are following strict safety and social distancing guidelines, so please keep your distance and practice proper social distancing to allow them to complete their work safely. At a minimum, please keep at least 6 feet away from any workers you see in the field.
  • Always stay away from downed and sagging power lines, flooded areas, and debris. Treat all fallen wires and anything touching them as though they are energized. Immediately report downed power lines to your electric company.
  • Never use a portable generator inside a home, garage, or crawl space, other enclosed areas, or anywhere exhaust fumes can enter into enclosed spaces. Fatal, odorless fumes can build up quickly, and opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide buildup in homes. Never connect a generator to your home’s circuits. Plug appliances directly into the generator.
  • Never place a burning candle near anything that could catch fire, or leave one unattended. Extinguish candles before going to sleep.
  • If your power goes out, avoid opening refrigerator and freezer doors in order to keep food cold.

EEI’s member companies—America’s investor-owned electric companies—are working around the clock to keep the lights on and to help their customers and employees stay safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 or coronavirus pandemic. They have activated their pandemic response plans and are focused on ensuring the safety of customers, communities, and crews. We are committed to powering through this crisis together.

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Resources
September 8
Electric Perspectives Podcast
An Army of Lineworkers Restoring Power After Hurricane Ida
September 3
September 2
September 2
August 31
August 28
Ida Press Release
August 22
Map
Tropical Storm Henri: Electric Company Mutual Assistance Networks Activated
August 20
Press Release
Tropical Storm Henri: The Time To Prepare Is Now
February 17
Electric Power Industry Closely Coordinating as Severe Winter Weather Continues to Impact Texas, Other States Across the Country
Load More
September 3, 2021
Mutual Assistance Networks Activated - Map
Electric Perspectives | January/February 2021
“Leading Positive Change in Turbulent Times” by Ben Fowke
Electric Perspectives | September/October 2020
COVID-19: Electric Companies Continue #PoweringThruTogether
September 17, 2020
Eric Florka: A Story of Survival
July 29, 2020
How To Make An Emergency Outage Or Disaster Kit
June 26, 2020
ESCC Resource Guide - Assessing and Mitigating the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19); Version 9
Updated Daily
COVID-19 Community Engagement Social Feed
Electric Perspectives | May/June 2020
Electric Companies Respond to the Global Pandemic
May 11, 2020
Contact Tracing – Planning Considerations for COVID-19 Contact Tracing in the Electric Power Industry
May 4, 2020
EEI Salutes our Nation’s Electric Company Workers
April 10, 2020
Maintaining Unity of Effort, Message, and Guidance
April 2, 2020
Energy Talk In Depth: Focus on Electric Companies and COVID-19
April 2, 2020
Mission-Essential Workforce - Testing and Protecting Mission-Essential Control Center and Generation Facility Personnel Is Fundamental
March
Electric Companies and Pandemic Planning: What You Should Know
March 19, 2020
Helping Customers During This Time of Need: All EEI Member Companies Suspend Electricity Disconnects
March
Empresas eléctricas y planificación pandémica: Lo que deberías saber
February
More Than 100 Ways to Improve Your Electric Bill